Life expectancy of a subwoofer

Marcus Aseth

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Hi guys, I own an SVS SB 1000 PRO and I was wondering what its life expectancy would be.
Furthermore I'm applying a -5,5dB preamp equalization through software to correct for the gain in some frequencies, which leads to me cranking the volume to max from my interface when I listen to it pretty often. Does that operation put more stress on it? If so, would you say it significantly impact it's life expectancy?
Because if that where to be the case, I would rather do the EQ again but this time without adding any gain nor preamp and by only removing gain from the peaks, which would allow me to listen at the same volume without cranking the volume to max.
 

Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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Not sure I get the question. If the sub signal from your interface is maxed, then increase the level with the sub’s gain control. Seems painfully obvious, so I’m guessing I’m missing something?

Regards,
Wayne
 

DonH57

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1. The life of any speaker is a function of many variables including driver construction and amplifier construction and components for an active speaker like a subwoofer. I have 12+ year old subs that are doing just fine, some 20+ year old speakers that still meet spec, and some that have crumbled surrounds and such. I suggest asking SVS.

2. Boundary interference (SBIR) and room modes can cause large peaks and valleys in frequency response especially in the subwoofer region. If the signal is not clipped (usually makes it sound raspy/harsh) and speakers are not stressed (harsh sound, mechanical noise) then you're probably fine.
 

natty

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Hi guys, I own an SVS SB 1000 PRO and I was wondering what its life expectancy would be.
Furthermore I'm applying a -5,5dB preamp equalization through software to correct for the gain in some frequencies, which leads to me cranking the volume to max from my interface when I listen to it pretty often. Does that operation put more stress on it? If so, would you say it significantly impact it's life expectancy?
Because if that where to be the case, I would rather do the EQ again but this time without adding any gain nor preamp and by only removing gain from the peaks, which would allow me to listen at the same volume without cranking the volume to max.
I would be suprised if an SVS SB 1000 PRO doesn't last 25 years. They have a digital signal processing stage built in which should protect the driver from being overdriven, almost no matter what you do on the dials. That said, if you know you are maxing out and you have an alternative method of setup, I would definitely do that, just to be safe. It will probably also sound better.

Taking a step back: boosting a missing frequency in the subwoofer domain is often a bad idea. You eat up a ton of power and headroom for very little benefit since you are often fighting a null or cancellation where more power = lower audible volume.

It is usually much better to simply EQ down the peaks in the response. So if you have that choice, I would definitely do it that way.

Taking another step back: If you are needing all the output of a sub you probably should have gotten the ported version which has TONS more output, for very little more money. SVS is cool. If you call them and tell them you want to step up to the PB1000, they will likely make it a painless process.
 

DonH57

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I would guess the amp will go before the speaker...

The reason boosting a true null is a bad idea is that it is caused by the direct sound, D, being cancelled by the reflected sound, R, so you get D - R = 0. If you amplify by 10, it also amplifies the reflected power, so 10D - 10R = 0 (still). All you've done is waste more power and it will be ridiculously loud outside the null position.
 

Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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There is no advantage to using exclusively negative-gain filters with capable subwoofers. When you turn the sub up to reclaim the overall volume level that was lost, you’ve lost as much headroom as you would have if you’d used boost filters.


Regards,
Wayne
 

AustinJerry

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Regarding your question about life expectancy, speakers and subs will last a long time as long as they are properly treated. For example, I have four Hsu ULS-15 subs that I purchased ten years ago. Over the years, I have had to replace one driver and one plate amp. The repair parts were reasonably priced and easy to install. The subs continue to perform as well as when they were new, verified with REW measurements.
 

Marcus Aseth

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Seems no matter how position my desk/sub inside the room, I always end with a weird starting measurement, weird because it has several peaks and nulls and is hard to work with.
So the choices I think I have are either place the EQ target to the lowest trough, use only negative filters and end up with 18-25 filters, or place the EQ target a bit higher such that it intersects the measurement in a way where most peaks have a well defined parabolic shape (each that can be fixed with a single filter) and it takes only 12 filters to adjust but some having gain up to 5dB...
So I would like to avoid using that much gain on the filters but I'm not sure I can, unless I change the Flatness Target I'm using on REW EQ tool, wich is of 2dB
I think mine is a problem with no solution, and it sucks :\
 

Ty_Tanium

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Sub-woofer life is a non-issue as long as you don’t abuse it. I have 1 pair of subs that are 16 years old, and another pair that are 14 years old, and they all still work just fine. So much so that I’ll be using them in my dedicated home theater build.

Your problem does have a solution - you’re just attacking it from the wrong angle. Equalizers generally don’t work well for narrow band / large swings. You need to address the acoustics of the room before attempting to EQ the curve.
 

Johnnie

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Sub-woofer life is a non-issue as long as you don’t abuse it. I have 1 pair of subs that are 16 years old, and another pair that are 14 years old, and they all still work just fine. So much so that I’ll be using them in my dedicated home theater build.

Your problem does have a solution - you’re just attacking it from the wrong angle. Equalizers generally don’t work well for narrow band / large swings. You need to address the acoustics of the room before attempting to EQ the curve.
Correct, simply put, you can EQ peaks but you need acoustic treatments to help correct the nulls (and peaks)
 

natty

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Seems no matter how position my desk/sub inside the room, I always end with a weird starting measurement, weird because it has several peaks and nulls and is hard to work with.
So the choices I think I have are either place the EQ target to the lowest trough, use only negative filters and end up with 18-25 filters, or place the EQ target a bit higher such that it intersects the measurement in a way where most peaks have a well defined parabolic shape (each that can be fixed with a single filter) and it takes only 12 filters to adjust but some having gain up to 5dB...
So I would like to avoid using that much gain on the filters but I'm not sure I can, unless I change the Flatness Target I'm using on REW EQ tool, wich is of 2dB
I think mine is a problem with no solution, and it sucks :\
Well this is a different question than longevity. The best way to deal with this is a second matched sub, positioned correctly, then time aligned with the first sub, to interact beneficially.
 

KikisO64

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I agree with Natty, a second sub properly configured makes a big difference. I also have a SVS which blew when I turned it off and then back on again when I returned from vacation. It was 5 years old, I contacted SVS via my dealer and they sold me a replacement plate amp at a very reasonable price so it's like new again.
 
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