Interpreting Audiolense simulated measurement graphs in particular potential ringing

Trdat

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Thread Starter
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Nov 6, 2019
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To be honest there is a whole set of charts from Audiolense I would like to interpret better, as well as taking my understanding of various concepts to the next level.

Bernt you mentioned that the ringing is the oscillation before and and after the main spike. Below is my simulated result. I would like to know if this is considered oscillation? And is the only way to reduce the oscilation by trying different XO widths and see which produces the least osciallation or is there a simpler way by understanidng the graph and aiming for something in particular?

You also mentioned that both drivers could potentially be out of phase with different widths in XO. HOw do I determine that? Is it the same as the ringing? And what is the solution for that?

41426
 

juicehifi

Audiolense
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Feb 5, 2018
Messages
207
Hi TrDat,

I belive we are mostly looking at the crossovers here. As you see, they oscillate out of phase with each other and sum up perfectly in the time domain. It also works very well in practice.

I recommend that you most of all focus on the simulated frequency response, the simulated impulse response and the simulated step response.And then you could check the correction filters for left side oscillation of a significant duration. There is plenty more to learn if you so desire, but it will take time.
 

Trdat

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Thread Starter
Joined
Nov 6, 2019
Messages
36
Hi TrDat,

I belive we are mostly looking at the crossovers here. As you see, they oscillate out of phase with each other and sum up perfectly in the time domain. It also works very well in practice.

I recommend that you most of all focus on the simulated frequency response, the simulated impulse response and the simulated step response.And then you could check the correction filters for left side oscillation of a significant duration. There is plenty more to learn if you so desire, but it will take time.
Hello Bernt,

I am ready to do what it takes to learn, so I think I might stick to this thread to make it an educational platfrom and continue with posting some of the other graphs you mention that are important and work on there interpretation but before I do, can you please explain and direct me what I am looking at when you say out of phase and when you mention sums perfectly in the time domain? What am I looking at specifically in the graph?

It would be great for an indepth manual one that covers all this, explaining it for the amatuer but I understand its a lot of work. Hopefully with some perceverance in this forum, I will get me there.

I think this is key ".And then you could check the correction filters for left side oscillation of a significant duration." but I will need to post those graphs I will once I have understood the basic of the above graph.
 

Trdat

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Thread Starter
Joined
Nov 6, 2019
Messages
36
Hi TrDat,

I belive we are mostly looking at the crossovers here. As you see, they oscillate out of phase with each other and sum up perfectly in the time domain. It also works very well in practice.

I recommend that you most of all focus on the simulated frequency response, the simulated impulse response and the simulated step response.And then you could check the correction filters for left side oscillation of a significant duration. There is plenty more to learn if you so desire, but it will take time.

Hey Bernt,

Your gonna get to a little explanation and direct me what I am looking at exactly when you say out of phase and when you mention sums perfectly in the time domain? What am I looking at specifically in the graph? I really would like to at least get the basics of this before we move on.

Regards
 
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