How to make a first order crossover in Audiolense?

2234rew

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Can someone please help with how to create a first order XO?

Thanks !
 

kevinzoe

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2234rew,
I posted something that answered this question a while back so here is the info again:
> 1st order (6dB/oct.) = 6.5 - 7.5 Audiolense xover filter width
> 2nd order (12dB/oct) = 3.8 - 4.3
> 3rd order (18dB/oct) = 3
> 4th order (24dB/oct) = 2.6

The above are fairly accurate representations for 1-2 octaves out from the xover frequency but they represent curved lines where the traditional linear sloped xovers are straight lines so they diverge from each other at some point. Hope this is good enough and is mildly helpful ...
 

2234rew

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Nov 24, 2020
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2234rew,
I posted something that answered this question a while back so here is the info again:
> 1st order (6dB/oct.) = 6.5 - 7.5 Audiolense xover filter width
> 2nd order (12dB/oct) = 3.8 - 4.3
> 3rd order (18dB/oct) = 3
> 4th order (24dB/oct) = 2.6

The above are fairly accurate representations for 1-2 octaves out from the xover frequency but they represent curved lines where the traditional linear sloped xovers are straight lines so they diverge from each other at some point. Hope this is good enough and is mildly helpful ...
Thanks, this is VERY helpful

I trust @juicehifi agrees with these numbers too, just as a check
 

juicehifi

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Feb 5, 2018
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^ It depends on how you look at it. The referred figures seem to emphasis the stop-band, but if you emphasis driver ioverlap you may draw a different conclusion.

A 2 octave width filter is 6 dB down one octave into the cutoff region, which is more or less the same as a 1st order. So as far as driver integration & overlap goes, I'd say that corresponds to a 1st order filter. But after 2 octaves the 2octave filter is literally silent, while a 1st order filter is "only" 12 db down, which means that the conventional 1st order filter will excite the driver significantly at lower frequencies. So the 2 octave xo is like a 1st order filter from 0 dB to -6 dB, but with a very steep stop-band following

This means that you e.g. can cross over drivers closer to the where the distortion increases, yet have a fairly shallow integration with the neighbour driver. You can run the tweeter perhaps one octave lower with less strain, and you could possibly run the bass one octave higher etc. This gives you a greater design freedom.

There is also the fact that steeper crossovers have more ringing than more shallow crossovers. The 2 octave filter has a time domain behavior that is quite close to a regular 1st order filter. A conventional high order crossover has much stronger ringing than the ones used in Audiolense.
 
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