Pint Sized Power: SVS's 3000 Micro Subwoofer and Prime Wireless Speaker 2.1 System Review

Manufacturer & Model
SVS 3000 Micro Subwoofer; SVS Prime Wireless Speaker System
MSRP
Prime Wireless Speaker: $599.99; 3000 Micro Subwoofer: $899.99
Link
https://www.svsound.com
Highlights
The Prime Wireless Speaker System: Space saving, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth functionality, 1" Aluminum Dome Tweeter and 4.5" Woofer with backside port, Compatibility with DTS Play-Fi app; Six available presets, 10-ft interconnect, Peppy Sound.

3000 Micro Subwoofer: Compact 10" cube, Dual Opposed 8" Drivers, 800 watt RMS amplifier, Inert Cabinet, Works with SVS control app, Performance down to 23Hz.
Summary
The SVS Prime Wireless Speaker System and 3000 Micro Subwoofer combine to create a competent performance driven 2.1 sound system. The wireless speakers offer owners access to compact stereo sound compliments of Wi-Fi and Bluetooth audio (with wired options available) and whole-home integration compliments of DTS Play-Fi. They also carry a sub-out option, which we used to bring SVS's new 3000 Micro Subwoofer into play. Micro is a potent miniaturized sub that can easily command a low-end presence in smaller rooms.
full?d=1638824314.jpg

The last time SVS sent a review "system" to my home, the shipping company's driver greeted me with a look that read, "Really? Are you serious, man?" Given he was about to move 600-lbs of boxes from his truck to my garage, I understood his saltiness. It was a wicked hot day, too. Who could possibly be thrilled about extracting heavy items from a trailer that's been baking in the sun?

This time around, SVS sent a system that didn't ruffle any feathers. Granted, you might assume that a subwoofer, speakers, and enough amplification and processing to command a 2.1-channel rig might require some heavy lifting. Nope! In fact, this delivery found the UPS driver smiling as he handed over two boxes weighing roughly 20-lbs each.

Thus began an experiential investigation that had little to do with the thunderous power SVS delivers with its top-shelf subwoofer and free-standing speakers and everything to do with the kind of performance its engineers can coax from shrunken space-saving designs. So, I ask you to shelve romantic visions of towering mains and menacing subwoofers that weigh more than the average human adult, opening your mind to the realities of a speaker package that most anyone can handle without breaking a sweat.


Honey, I Shrunk the… Subwoofer?
full?d=1638824314.jpg


Size is an unfortunate reality in the world of reference-grade low frequency reproduction. It's a simple fact that large drivers effectively move air and generate those long and powerful sound waves we all crave, and beefed-up enclosures lay the groundwork for efficiency and high levels of output. Unfortunately, both of those design elements make for speakers that are big and heavy.

Shrinking a subwoofer's size creates obvious advantages for owners, particularly regarding ease of handling and room aesthetics, but strikes at the heart of what we all crave from a sub: insane levels of output, nuanced playback, and serious low frequency power. It also presents significant challenges on the design front, forcing engineers to creatively squeeze high levels of performance from driver and amplification pairings housed in a less than optimal space. As we found during a past review of GoldenEar Technology's SuperSub X, it is possible to get notable bass from a small package. And, as this review shows, it appears as if SVS has cracked the code, but with a price tag that's far more palatable.

The 3000 Micro Subwoofer ($899.99) is the official low-end baby of the SVS family. Not only is it the most petite sub in the company's lineup, but its March 2021 birthday makes it the company's most recent addition. Weighing 22.5-lbs and measuring 10.9" H x 11.7" W x 10.7" D, Micro reads like a true fly-weight on paper. But don't let those numbers lull you into thinking that it's a stripped-down budget speaker. Yes, it's more compact and less expensive than its significantly larger brethren, but SVS didn't skimp on key design elements.

Micro's physical presence throws solid punches for its diminutive size and reasonable asking price, making it a speaker that can proudly stand guard under an office desk or in the corner of a busy area of a home. The sub's wet-looking piano gloss finish flows flawlessly from surface to surface without seams or breaks, and its matching metal grilles look like brutal pulses of sound shaped them; the two combine for a solid visual package. And curious eyes wandering to the sub’s backside will find a surprisingly packed interactive plate amp that wraps to its underside. Toss in removable rubber isolation feet and a front-mounted SVS badge, and Micro appears to be a speaker that's ready to go all 12 rounds of a heavyweight bout.

3000 Micro's proprietary dual opposing 8" woofers are driven by a Sledge STA-800D2 Class-D amp with discrete MOSFET outputs. Benefiting from design elements used in SVS's 16-Ultra subs, the amp delivers an impressive 800 Watts RMS (2,500 Watts peak). Equally impressive are technologies packed into the sub's operational architecture, such as a 50 MHz Analog Devices DSP and wireless tuning controls supplied by SVS's Subwoofer Control Smartphone app (iOS, Android, Amazon). And for hands-on interactions, a rear-mounted Intelligent Control Interface (ICI) with LED indicator lights provides direct access to volume, low pass filter, and phase controls, RCA inputs and outputs, and a USB port for use with SVS's Wireless Audio Adapter.

full?d=1638827913.jpg


The sub's 8" active drivers dig from 240Hz to 23Hz (±3 dB), which is quite deep considering the speaker's compact nature. My own in-room measurements (Room EQ Wizard, UMIK-1 mic, one meter) fell in line with that spec, revealing plenty of deep bass for movie and music content to excite. Since the sub weighs less than 25-lbs, you might wonder how stable it is when driven hard. By positioning the drivers on opposite sides of the cabinet, mechanical energy that would otherwise transfer to the cabinet is effectively canceled. That means the sub won't vibrate and dance across a hard surface. In fact, the cabinet is dead calm when the sub is powered on and the drivers are kicking up a storm of low-end frequencies.

That brings us to the other product featured in this review: SVS's Prime Wireless Speaker System ($599.99). Much like the 3000 Micro Subwoofer, Prime Wireless brings lots of technology and versatility to the table without physical bulk. If anything, it's the stereo equivalent of anti-bulk. The system features an active speaker, housing processing and amplification duties, and a passive speaker that connect with a thin 10' long cable. Its overall size is highly manageable, with the speakers weighing 9.55-lbs (active) and 8.73-lbs (passive), measuring 10.24" H x 6.10" W x 7" D each.

full?d=1638824314.jpg


Physically, the speaker looks similar to SVS's passive Prime Bookshelf model but measures 2" to 3" smaller in all three cabinet dimensions and carries added controls and connectivity options. The active speaker's frontside is the biggest differentiator, presenting two multi-function knobs and a small backlit display that shows six preset slots and one of four sources (Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, Optical, and Auxiliary). The knobs are assigned with source, preset, and playback controls and are notched to provide tactile feedback when turned and depressed.

The active speaker houses the system's power and source connections, giving owners access to RCA stereo and 3.5mm mini-stereo analog inputs, along with optical and ethernet digital inputs. Internally, it carries both Wi-Fi and Bluetooth capabilities and a 192kHz/24-bit DAC to convert digital content to analog for playback.

Like Micro, Prime Wireless is dressed with a delectable black piano gloss finish that glistens with a wet sheen. Its edges are seamless and rounded, and removing the peg-mounted cloth grille reveals an aggressive-looking driver array. The speaker's two-way ported design consists of a 1" aluminum dome tweeter and a 4.5" polypropylene midrange driver (digital crossover: 2kHz with 12 dB/octave slopes), both of which are independently fed by a 200 watt amplifier section that reserves 50 watts of Class-D power for each driver.

full?d=1638827913.jpg


SVS says that Prime Wireless's frequency response extends from 52Hz to a lofty 25kHz (±3 dB). My in-room measurements (Room EQ Wizard, UMIK-1 microphone, 1 meter) paint a slightly different picture, though it's important to remember these measurements capture output within my specific room. As you can see, I captured usable bass down to the 70 Hz range, with a sharp roll-off thereafter. The top-end measured well beyond 20Hz and the capabilities of my gear, which is a positive sign.

Off-axis in-room measurements look good, with a 45-degree snapshot showing a fairly even loss in dB (green line), much like a measurement taken at 90-degrees (blue line). As I found during listening sessions, the speaker imaged well while sitting in the sweet spot, and moving off-axis didn't result in a detriment to the overall presentation.


Set Up and Control
full?d=1638824314.jpg

I've said it before, and I'll say it again: the SVS unboxing experience is top-notch. The company routinely designs highly-competent packaging that safely transports its sonic gear directly to your doorstep, and does so with the added benefit of branding that generates intrigue and excitement. The 3000 Micro Subwoofer and Prime Wireless Speaker System didn't disappoint in this department, with all three speakers arriving nestled within high-quality packing materials.

Micro's in-box contents were sparse, shipping with a power cord and a freebee (an SVS t-shirt). Prime Wireless also included a power cord, along with thin stick-on isolation feet and the aforementioned speaker/power interconnect. Aside from advertising leaflets and a quick start guide, neither speaker shipped with a detailed user guide. You'll need to visit SVS's website for that.

For purposes of critical evaluation, the speakers were deployed in a 2.1 configuration in my reference home theater room (18' D x 13.5' W x 8' T). The sub was positioned at the left quarter point of the room's front wall, and the Prime Wireless speakers were outfitted with isolation feet and placed on ear-level stands situated roughly three feet from the room's front wall, two feet from sidewalls, and 80" from the primary listening position. Initial listening tests found a toe-in firing directly at the primary listening position produced the best imaging and largest soundstage.

If I were purchasing this system for personal use, I'd deploy it in a much smaller setting, such as an office with a desk or a small room's entertainment center.

full?d=1638824314.jpg


Prime Wireless was integrated with my home network using the DTS Play-Fi app. Much like SVS's Prime Wireless SoundBase system (reviewed here), the DTS Play-Fi app is the primary point of wireless control for the speakers. It facilitates network integration, provides direct in-app access to your favorite subscription services and stored music, controls other Play-Fi capable devices for multi-room audio playback, and allows owners to adjust volume levels. It also has a selectable "Critical Listening Mode" that enables 24-bit/192kHz lossless streaming over Wi-Fi to one zone at a time. That means you can enjoy true Hi-Res streaming without downsampling the quality of your source.

All being told, it took me about 20 minutes to set-up and integrate the speakers with my network. That time included a speaker firmware update and registering TIDAL, Qobuz, and Spotify subscriptions within the Play-Fi app.

Proper subwoofer integration required more of an effort. Once a final resting place was identified using Room EQ Wizard measurements, the sub was connected to the speakers and SVS's Subwoofer Control app was called into duty. The app is loaded with various DSP controls, including phase, gain, room gain compensation, an adjustable low pass filter, polarity, phase, and a three-band parametric equalizer (PEQ). It also saves custom presets for various listening scenarios, a welcomed add-on for subs tasked with splitting time between movies, music, and gaming.

full?d=1638827913.jpg


I activated all three PEQ filters to flatten a nasty peak in the 30Hz range. While I still prefer the correction capabilities of a software package like Dirac Bass Control, the 3000 Micro's PEQ filters make it possible to tame output issues without the expense of external processing. The app doesn't provide any means for identifying where a filter is needed, so you'll need to have a calibrated microphone and measurement software to take advantage of Micro's PEQ capabilities.

From a set-up perspective, getting the entire 2.1 system dialed in required a moderate amount of technical skill. Yes, you could get away with a simple "set it and forget it" approach, but for the best sound experience, owners should explore the more granular integration features offered by the speakers' apps.


2.0 Music Performance
full?d=1638824314.jpg


Before diving into a full 2.1 system review, I gave the Prime Wireless Speaker System a chance to strut its stuff as a stereo pair. Keep in mind, it's a small system and in-room measurements in two different medium-sized locations within my home exhibited a fairly sharp roll-off in the 70Hz-80Hz range. While those measurements are lighter than SVS's factory specification of 52Hz (±3 dB), the system might carry a little more meat on the low-end bone in a different setting. In other words: your mileage may vary.

With the Critical Listening Mode engaged, I called upon two reference TIDAL tracks to gauge imaging, breadth of soundstage, and the ability to craft nuanced bass. I was immediately impressed during the opening moments of Whethan's "Good Nights" (16-bit/44.1kHz FLAC). Well rounded, natural-sounding vocals were etched with razor-sharp details cradled within the song's echoey airiness. It was exactly what I expected to hear, revealing competent imaging capabilities. The track's low-end demands, however, were a bit more hit and miss. The song's mid-bass character thrived enough to keep the feel of the song intact, but playful punches of ultra-low bass during the song's chorus were notably suppressed.

John Bellion's "80s Films" (16/44.1 FLAC) produced similar results. The song flowed with pleasant and composed imaging, weight throughout the mid-range, and a light, low-end presence. The same was heard during Lorde's "Pure Heroine" (16/44.1 FLAC), which anchors its driving nature with a pounding bass drum. The speakers were able to reproduce Heroine's drum, but lacked the native capabilities to deliver it with the presence of a larger full-range speaker. As I challenged the speaker system with other reference tracks, it repeatedly responded with a peppy and detailed presentation that was a tad bass shy. The speaker never chuffed or choked on bass-heavy tracks, as onboard DSP made sure its 4.5" driver stayed in control as volume levels and track demands intensified. In fact, I found the speaker played with plenty of composure as it approached 92dB of output.

Female vocals, namely those of Norah Jones as heard on Come Away With Me (16/44.1 FLAC), were soft and loaded with character. Jones has a signature texture to her vocals and the Prime Wireless stereo pair did an excellent job of recreating that sound. Vocal imaging was well above average, and vocal weight sounded spot on. This was evident throughout songs like "Turn Me On" and "Come Away With Me." I was particularly smitten with "Sunrise" (Norah Jones, Feels Like Home, 16/44.1 FLAC), which flowed with raspy vocals anchored by pleasant notes of bass, an acoustic guitar, and a piano; the song's soundstage was wide and loaded with defined separation of the song's components.

Following several hours of listening to the Prime Wireless speakers in a 2.0 arrangement, my review notes revealed a few common themes. First, the speaker images quite well. If you set the system up correctly, you'll be rewarded with plenty of definition, a composed soundstage, and a 2-channel experience that's leaps and bounds better than any single wireless speaker. Second, the speaker exhibits a shallow character in the low-bass region. For some styles of music, such as singer/songwriter, folk, country, and some pop, this isn’t an issue. But, if you're a fan of music with hefty low-end demands (think electronica and hip-hop), you'll definitely want to recruit the help of a sub.

full?d=1638824314.jpg


Placement-wise, Prime Wireless is a speaker that needs a bit of distance from rear vertical surfaces, be it a wall or the backside of a cabinet. A best-case scenario would find the speaker a foot or more away from such a surface, as its rear-firing port moves quite a bit of air. Definitely don't plan on jamming the speaker against a surface. Even a gap of an inch or two might impair the port's ability to function properly. So, if you're placing these speakers on a desk or an entertainment center, evaluate breathing room before you purchase.

One of the beauties of the Prime Wireless speaker system is its usability. Aside from ease of set-up, the speaker's integration with the DTS Play-Fi app grants easy, no-hassle access to a range of music services. My interactions with TIDAL and Qobuz within the app were practically lag-free, making for a pleasant playback experience. Track timeline and volume controls were also responsive; I was particularly impressed with the ability to make ultra-fine adjustments to volume levels.

The system was also easily discovered as a Bluetooth device. During 2.0 system testing, I streamed the melodic songs of The Sundays (Spotify) using Bluetooth, and the resulting sound quality was detailed and loaded with clarity.

Controls within the DTS Play-Fi app are intuitive, and any learning curve associated with basic features and functions will likely be short for most owners. The same goes for the Prime Wireless speaker system, which presents few – if any – operational hurdles. The biggest sticking point during my evaluation was learning how to lock in a preset using the active speaker's controls. Even that was quickly solved by reading six short instructions in the online manual.


2.1 Music Performance
full?d=1638824314.jpg


SVS asked me to review the speakers and subwoofer as a 2.1 system, and bringing the 3000 Micro into the mix was as simple as connecting a cable to the back of the active speaker and routing it to the subwoofer. Once hooked up, the Prime Wireless automatically recognized the sub and applied an 80Hz crossover to any incoming content – It was that easy.

I immediately returned to Wethan's "Good Nights" and Bellion's "80's Films," and my ears were greeted with a wave of low-end content. For its size, Micro dug curiously deep. Bellion's song pounded away with intricate bass layers, drops, and pulses fully revealed. The crossover between the speakers and sub was seamless, allowing the track to dance and weave itself forward without sounding disjointed. Similarly, Wethan's bass attack on "Good Nights" was given proper treatment.

The success with those two tracks led me to revisit "Pure Heroine," and the bass drum on this toe-tapping track really took off, softening the song's presentation while adding a richly textured low-end attack. Definition of bass is a key element of this song's presentation and Micro did an impressive job, situating the drum's presence dead-center within the soundstage.

full?d=1638824314.jpg


The Cars "Let's Go" (16/44.1 FLAC) has remained a favorite track for evaluating the composure of a soundstage, and Prime Wireless handled it well with the pinpoint placement of instruments and vocals across the front of the room. The Micro 3000 interjected its peppy nature, keeping up with the kick drum and never sounding loose as it rounded out the bottom end of bass notes. "Let's Go" did reveal a touch of brightness in the speaker's high frequency delivery, but nothing overly objectionable. Dialing volume levels back helped to tame this noted trait.

With volume levels dropped to 75dB, Pink Floyd's "Comfortably Numb" (16/44.1 FLAC) had a nicely controlled low-end flexed with detail and presence. That control wasn't lost as volume levels were pushed to 90+dB, which was the top-end of the system's best-sounding output. The Prime Wireless speakers were the limiting factor in the equation, as the 3000 Micro seemed comfortable at this limit. Keeping volumes elevated, I explored Deadmau5's extensive TIDAL catalog, starting with the W:/2016album/. The 3000 Micro's capabilities weathered everything Deadmau5 could muster, dishing layers upon layers of bass. Transients were taut, keeping output tight and punchy throughout these challenging electronic tracks.


2.1 Movie Performance
full?d=1638824314.jpg


The true stress test for the 2.1 Prime Wireless Speaker and 3000 Micro Subwoofer system came at the hands of three high-octane Blu-rays spun by an Oppo BDB-103 player with audio delivered by a digital optical connection. The first few moments of integration were a tad bumpy, as the Prime Wireless active speaker balked at receiving a Bitstream signal from the player. Changing the Oppo's optical output to 192k LPCM eliminated that hiccup, and the trio of speakers was ready for movie duty.

Star Wars: The Force Awakens is loaded with dazzling audio moments, and Chapters 17 (Marketplace Chase) and 18 (The Flacon Flies Again) were the perfect starting place for a demo evaluation. Having goosed the sub's volume from -12dB to -10dB, I pressed play and satiated any and all anticipation. The resulting audio presentation was quite impressive given the system's overall size. Dialog was intelligible, the soundstage's complexity was laced with a sense of spaciousness, and the 3000 Micro kept the intensity of explosions and spaceship engines intact. Sonic weight associated with the Flacon's weapons had presence, and some of the film’s more dynamic moments, like when the Falcon's engines sweep across the screen before the spaceship plunges toward a Star Destroyer’s carcass, crackled with energy.

Chapter 46's (Forest Duel) lightsaber battle found the 3000 Micro delivering plenty punch and rumble. I did note the sub, at times, had a "somewhat confined presence," where bass was present but didn't appear to radiate far from the sub – likely, this had more to do with the size of the room than the sub, itself. Micro never objected when volume levels were pushed, and it definitely had moments that sent shockwaves through the room's seating.

Next up was Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World and an immediate visit to the film's early battle scene (Chapter 4 - Under Attack). As the HMS Surprise received fire, the Prime Wireless speakers threw audio debris scattering around the soundstage. Micro anchored the chaos with low-end rumbles as cannonballs flew through the ship. The film's audio track has a tendency to sound bright, and the Prime Wireless speakers exhibited some sharpness with higher-level details.

Return fire delivered by the HMS Surprise resulted in pleasant levels of thunderous bass, and Micro's output was loaded with detail you'd expect from a proper sub. Most importantly, Micro kept transients tight and remained in control as the track's chaotic nature reached a fever pitch.

With those two films back on the shelf, I reached for one final disc: Steven Speilberg's War of the Worlds. The Blu-ray version of this film has one of – if not the – most devastating bass scenes in all of film, beginning with Chapter 4's electrical storm and ending with Chapter 6's pod emergence scene. Once again, the Prime Wireless speakers kept dialog intelligible amidst an active soundstage, and Micro confidently anchored LFE demands as they grew with intensity.

The pod emergence scene is a brutal task for any sub to tackle, and the 3000 Micro held its own as volume levels reached high into the 90dB range. As the alien pod busted loose through the street's blacktop, I could feel the earth cracking in my room. While much more subtle than my reference subwoofer array, SVS's miniaturized low-end cannon pushed enough bass energy to give the scene a crackling presence. Most importantly, Micro never bottomed out. In fact, it was able to capture a notable bass drop that plays once the pod is fully erect and preparing to attack.


Conclusion
The Prime Wireless Speaker System and 3000 Micro Subwoofer form a marriage that achieves everything a solid stereo setup should offer, with the addition of several key advantages: It's small enough to be manageable and self-contained; it's easy to set up and carries advanced controls to customize and streamline playback; it offers access to the industry's top streaming services with Hi-Res capabilities; and, it can integrate with other Play-Fi enabled gear throughout a home.

Prime Wireless is a capable speaker system that can certainly be used as a straight 2.0 stereo pair. Its imaging and soundstage capabilities are quite nice, and its mid-range tonal characteristics make it a great choice for mellow styles of music. The speaker does exhibit some brightness and shallow bass tendencies, which makes it a perfect mate for the 3000 Micro Subwoofer. Micro's low-end output is ridiculously fun, surprisingly powerful, and completely necessary if you're planning on using Prime Wireless to deliver audio as part of an entertainment system or a multi-purpose computer rig. 3000 Micro would also deliver excellent performance as subwoofer in a smaller tradtional system, making it easy to recommend.

full?d=1497080930.png



Prime Wireless Speaker System Specifications
  • Frequency Response: 52Hz-25kHz (±3 dB)
  • Active Speaker Dimensions: 260mm (H) X 155mm (W) X 183.22mm (D)
  • Active Speaker Weight: 10.24" (H) X 6.10" (W) X 7.21" (D)
  • Passive Speaker Dimensions: 260mm (H) X 155mm (W) X 160.4mm (D)
  • Passive Speaker Weight: 10.24" (H) X 6.10" (W) X 7" (D)
  • Port: 2.36” wide-flared rear-firing port
  • 1" Aluminum Dome Tweeter: FEA-optimized diffuser for airy and unveiled presentation; Aluminum dome for exceptional transient response
  • 4.5" Midrange Driver: Polypropylene cone for excellent stiffness/mass ratio and pistonic behavior; Aluminum shorting ring to reduce gap inductance, lower distortion, and enhance high frequency response; Cast ABS-fiberglass composite basket ensures precision component alignment and excellent thermal transfer; Vented voice coil former minimizes air compression artifacts
  • Amplifier: Dual Class-D Power Amps for Discrete Driver Bi-amplification; 200 watt (50 watt x 4) RMS Power; Digital controlled tweeter-to-woofer crossover: 2kHz (12dB/octave slope)
  • Input/Output: Left/Right RCA Input Impedance: 20K; 3.5mm Aux Input Impedance: 20K; Optical Input: S/PDIF receiver works at a wide range of sampling frequencies between 18 kHz and 96 kH; Subwoofer Output: 2V Auto Detecting Low Pass Filter: An active Low Pass Filter at 80Hz is engaged when subwoofer detected
  • General: Switch Mode Power Supply: Auto Switching 100 – 120V / 220 – 240V, 50/60Hz
  • General: Fuse: 15A/250V
  • General: Standard Detachable Power Cord
  • General: Standard Active-Passive Speaker Interconnect Cable: 3m / 10ft
  • General: 15 ft and 20 ft Prime Wireless Speaker System interconnect cables are available upon request. Please call (877.626.5623) or email us for pricing and to place an order.
3000 Micro Subwoofer Specifications
  • Dimensions (including grilles): 10.9” (278mm) H X 11.7” (297mm) W X 10.7” (271mm) D
  • Weight: 22.5lbs (10.2kg)
  • Packaged Dimensions: 13.9” (353mm) H X 15.4” (390mm) W X 15.4” (390mm) D
  • Packaged Weight: 26.7lbs (12.1kg)
  • Drivers: Dual opposing 8-inch active drivers designed acoustically and electrically in parallel
  • Amplifer: 800-watt RMS, 2,500-watt peak Sledge STA-800D amplifier with fully discrete MOSFET output
  • Amplifier Con't: Rear-mounted internal amplifier with Intelligent Control Interface (ICI)
  • Finish: High-end Piano Gloss Black and Piano Gloss White finish options
  • Feet: Screw-in rubber feet
  • Cabinet Material: Structurally reinforced MDF cabinet construction
 
Last edited:

Sonnie

Senior Admin
Staff member
Joined
Apr 2, 2017
Messages
4,422
Location
Alabama
My AV System  
Preamp, Processor or Receiver
Monolith HTP-1 Processor (Movies and Surround)
Main Amp
Sanders Sound System Magtech (Dual Amps)
Additional Amp
Emotiva XPA-Eleven
Computer Audio
Intel NUC w/ Roon ROCK
DAC
miniDSP SHD (Two-Channel Music Only)
Universal / Blu-ray / CD Player
Panasonic UB9000 4K UHD Player (for media discs)
Front Speakers
MartinLogan Renaissance ESL 15A
Center Channel Speaker
MartinLogan Focus C-18
Surround Speakers
MartinLogan EFX Surrounds
Surround Back Speakers
MartinLogan ElectroMotion ESL
Front Height Speakers
MartinLogan EM-IC
Rear Height Speakers
MartinLogan EM-IC
Subwoofers
SVS SB16-Ultra x4 (music) + PB16-Ultra x2 (movies)
Other Speakers or Equipment
VTI Amp Stands for the Magtechs
Video Display Device
JVC DLA-NX9
Screen
Elite 128" Screen
Remote Control
Universal MX-890
Streaming Equipment
Roku Ultra
Streaming Subscriptions
Lifetime Roon Subscription
Tidal
qobuz
Netflix
Amazon Prime
Satellite System
Dish Joey 4K
Other Equipment
Salamander Synergy Equipment Stand
Thanks for the review Todd... well done! :T

I'd like to tryout about 8 of these micros in my room to see how they would fair vs. the big boys.
 

Mike-48

Member
Joined
May 27, 2019
Messages
127
Location
Portland, Oregon, USA
Todd, this looks like an interesting system for someone who wants near full range for little money. I was wondering what smoothing settings you used for the FR graphs of the Micro and then the Prime.
 

Todd Anderson

Editor / Senior Admin
Staff member
Thread Starter
Joined
Jan 20, 2017
Messages
7,397
Location
Balt/Wash Metro
My AV System  
Preamp, Processor or Receiver
StormAudio ISP.24 MK2
Main Amp
Emotiva XPA-5
Additional Amp
Emotiva XPA Gen3 2.8 multichannel amp
Other Amp
Denon X8500H
Computer Audio
AudioEngine A2+
DAC
THX ONYX
Universal / Blu-ray / CD Player
Kaleidescape TERRA, OPPO UDP-203, Panasonic UB9000
Front Speakers
GoldenEar Technology Triton One.R
Center Channel Speaker
GoldenEar Technology SuperCenter Reference
Surround Speakers
SVS Ultra Surround
Surround Back Speakers
SVS Ultra Bookshelf
Front Height Speakers
SVS Prime Elevation x4 (Top Front, Top Mid-Front)
Rear Height Speakers
SVS Prime Elevation x4 (Top Middle, Top Rear)
Subwoofers
dual SVS SB16s + dual PSA XS30s
Other Speakers or Equipment
Behringer 1124p; Aura Bass Shaker Pros; SuperSub X
Video Display Device
JVC NX7
Screen
Carada Cine-White 0 gain
Streaming Equipment
iFi Audio Zen Blue
Streaming Subscriptions
Qobuz, TIDAL, Spotify, ROON
Other Equipment
LG Electronics 65-inch B6 OLED, Sony 65-inch X900F, ZeroSurge 8R15W x 2, ZeroSurge 2R15W x 2
Thanks for the review Todd... well done! :T

I'd like to tryout about 8 of these micros in my room to see how they would fair vs. the big boys.
Interesting thought. You'd have a lot of headroom and even bass! But ultimately, it won't dig as deep for movies. Music-wise... might sound really good!
 

Todd Anderson

Editor / Senior Admin
Staff member
Thread Starter
Joined
Jan 20, 2017
Messages
7,397
Location
Balt/Wash Metro
My AV System  
Preamp, Processor or Receiver
StormAudio ISP.24 MK2
Main Amp
Emotiva XPA-5
Additional Amp
Emotiva XPA Gen3 2.8 multichannel amp
Other Amp
Denon X8500H
Computer Audio
AudioEngine A2+
DAC
THX ONYX
Universal / Blu-ray / CD Player
Kaleidescape TERRA, OPPO UDP-203, Panasonic UB9000
Front Speakers
GoldenEar Technology Triton One.R
Center Channel Speaker
GoldenEar Technology SuperCenter Reference
Surround Speakers
SVS Ultra Surround
Surround Back Speakers
SVS Ultra Bookshelf
Front Height Speakers
SVS Prime Elevation x4 (Top Front, Top Mid-Front)
Rear Height Speakers
SVS Prime Elevation x4 (Top Middle, Top Rear)
Subwoofers
dual SVS SB16s + dual PSA XS30s
Other Speakers or Equipment
Behringer 1124p; Aura Bass Shaker Pros; SuperSub X
Video Display Device
JVC NX7
Screen
Carada Cine-White 0 gain
Streaming Equipment
iFi Audio Zen Blue
Streaming Subscriptions
Qobuz, TIDAL, Spotify, ROON
Other Equipment
LG Electronics 65-inch B6 OLED, Sony 65-inch X900F, ZeroSurge 8R15W x 2, ZeroSurge 2R15W x 2
Todd, this looks like an interesting system for someone who wants near full range for little money. I was wondering what smoothing settings you used for the FR graphs of the Micro and then the Prime.
Hey Mike, I believe both were 1/12 smoothing.

If wireless functionality and saving on space are super high on your list, then Prime Wireless is a great option. You're eliminating the need for an AVR... of course, to make it all work, you need convenient access to power for a clean install. You'll end up with imaging, etc, that you won't experience with most traditional all-in-one speakers. IMO, Micro is a must have addition.
 
Last edited:

Coy Ramsey

Member
Joined
Jan 6, 2019
Messages
67
My AV System  
Preamp, Processor or Receiver
Yamaha Aventage RX-A660 AVR
Other Amp
4 Yamaha WX50 amps for MusicCast distributed audio
Universal / Blu-ray / CD Player
Sony X700
Front Speakers
Elac Debut 2.0 BS5.2
Center Channel Speaker
SVS Ultra center to replace Elac Debut 2.0 CC5.2
Surround Speakers
Polk in-wall
Rear Height Speakers
Polk in-ceiling
Subwoofers
RSL Speedwoofer 10s
Other Speakers or Equipment
Episode ceiling speakers for 4 distributed zones
Video Display Device
Samsung
Screen
65"
Remote Control
Logitech Harmony
Streaming Subscriptions
none, use Pandora free
Other Equipment
Episode in-ceiling for distributed audio into 4 zones
No Amazon Music HD included ? AM is now a value leader but poor hardware support. Maybe Tidal has that covered with their new pricing. Otherwise, a lot here to like but a bit pricey.
 

gregw

New Member
Joined
Aug 12, 2021
Messages
21
My AV System  
Preamp, Processor or Receiver
Yamaha TSR5830
Center Channel Speaker
SVS Prime Center
Subwoofers
SVS SB-1000 PRO
Video Display Device
Sony 65 in x950H
Streaming Equipment
Aplle TV 4k, Shield TV
The micro is a feat of engineering but most people should just make room for 2 inches more in every direction and get an svs sb 1000 pro which goes a little lower in the frequency response and costs $300 less. If they got the micro down to about an 8 or 9 in cube going down to about 28 hz I think that would be more compelling for a small space.
 
Top Bottom