CEDIA 2018: Procella Audio Shows Off Its All-New V21 Bass Engine II Subwoofer

CEDIA 2018: Procella Audio Shows Off Its All-New V21 Bass Engine II Subwoofer

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(September 7, 2016) Sitting proudly near the center of San Diego’s monstrous convention center is a subwoofer that – visually – appears primed to dominate all things low end. It’s called the V21 Bass Engine II Subwoofer, and represents one of Procella Audio’s latest large-theater creations.

First, it’s important to understand the size of the V21, which measures 44.4” W x 23.6” H x26.4” and weighs a killer 179 lbs (219 lbs shipped) – keep in mind, this is a passive speaker. If it were a box, it would comfortably accommodate an average sized human. Then there’s the aesthetic appeal, which is gnarly and dangerous, looking edgy and almost scary.

The sub features 21” drivers with Neo-dymium magnets and large 4.5” voice coils, positioned facing each other in an offset “V Loaded” configuration. According to Procella, this design lends to coupling and compression loading of the drivers along with reduced cone excursion at peak volume levels for lower distortion and a better overall transient response. Performance-wise, it’s capable of dishing 139 dB continuously – 145 dB of peak – with performance down to 18Hz at high output levels.

The V21 requires the use of an external power amp (which helps to keep its own weight more manageable). Procella says the company’s DA07 (which delivers 1,400 watts to each driver) is the perfect mate.

Costing some $11,000, the V21 represents a significant investment. My only disappoint is that the V21 was merely statically displayed on CEDIA's show floor. This is one monster I’d like to hear (not to mention feel) in action.
 

Matthew J Poes

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Todd I actually heard the first version of this sub. It’s absolutely amazing. I really wanted to DIY my own version of this sub but it’s huge!

I really love this brand. If I didn’t own what I own, these are what I would own instead.
 

Todd Anderson

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The V18?

The picture of the V21 does it no justice. There's no way I could fit it in my home theater. I'd kill to here this puppy in action. I'd bet it just about blows the doors off anything I've ever heard... of course acquiring one would set the wallet back a few years!

What a great piece of audio gear!
 

Matthew J Poes

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The V18?

The picture of the V21 does it no justice. There's no way I could fit it in my home theater. I'd kill to here this puppy in action. I'd bet it just about blows the doors off anything I've ever heard... of course acquiring one would set the wallet back a few years!

What a great piece of audio gear!
Yes the V18.

It was setup in a baffle wall as part of a demo room. Very cool sub.

Because it uses pro drivers it’s very efficient with a ton of output between 35hz and 80hz. Like more than you have likely ever heard in your life or could possibly need. It’s not really any different form a high end commercial cinema sub.

In a large venue it wouldn’t have much output below 30hz, the driver is too displacement restricted. However In a small domestic space it’s large driver size and sufficient xmax mean with proper eq you get pretty serious deep bass output. It wouldn’t better a pair of SVS ported 16’s below 30hz, in fact it’s possible it’s only on par with a single 16 at that frequency. However above that point you would likely need 4-8 of those SVS subs to keep up (and you would probably be drawing 8 times the power too). It’s all a trade off and for most people a giant clam shell loaded dual 21” sub doesn’t make a lot of sense. However when you have a large home cinema and you want to hit reference levels it’s really a necessary tool.
 

Todd Anderson

News Editor / Reviewer/ Senior Admin
Staff member
Thread Starter
Joined
Jan 20, 2017
Messages
4,964
Location
Balt/Wash Metro
My AV System  
Preamp, Processor or Receiver
Yamaha RX-A3050
Main Amp
Emotiva XPA-5
Additional Amp
Emotiva XPA Gen 2 4xStereo 2XSingle
Other Amp
VSX-1016THX
Universal / Blu-ray / CD Player
OPPO UDP-203
Front Speakers
SVS Ultra Towers
Center Channel Speaker
SVS Ultra Center
Surround Speakers
SVS Ultra Surround
Surround Back Speakers
SVS Ultra Bookshelf
Front Height Speakers
SVS Prime Elevation
Rear Height Speakers
SVS Prime Elevation
Subwoofers
dual SVS SB16s + dual PSA XS30s
Other Speakers or Equipment
Behringer 1124p; Aura Bass Shaker Pros; SuperSub X
Video Display Device
JVC RS520
Screen
Carada Cine-White 0 gain
Other Equipment
LG Electronics 65-inch B6 OLED, OPPO Sonica
You say a small domestic space (and I get it)... but I'm not sure how anyone would fit this beast in a typical sized home theater room?
 

Matthew J Poes

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You say a small domestic space (and I get it)... but I'm not sure how anyone would fit this beast in a typical sized home theater room?
Hah sorry. I use that term to refer to to its acoustic size. Small just means a room where at least one dimension is smaller than the length of the lowest mode wavelength (20-30hz range). That typically means you need rooms with like 25 foot ceilings or more and lengths/widths that exceed that.
You say a small domestic space (and I get it)... but I'm not sure how anyone would fit this beast in a typical sized home theater room?
You Know what Todd, I should totally do an article on this. I use the term "small" domestic space to refer to a space where room modes are a major issue. If the dimensions of a room are smaller than 1/2 the wavelength of the lowest typical mode of concern (let's say 20hz) then you have powerful modes in the bass range of concern. Most domestic rooms are never any larger than 20-30 feet and 8-10 feet is a very common ceiling height. As such domestic spaces always have modes that range between 20hz and 200hz and they are often a serious problem. However, once the room's dimensions begin to exceed that point, the modes shift lower and become a less serious issue. Large commercial cinema's that might be 50-60 feet wide making the width (one of the typically smaller dimensions of a room) more than twice the round trip distance of the lowest audible mode. Tall ceilings that are acoustic in nature (and thus absorb ceiling reflections) and even longer lengths of sometimes over 100 feet mean that large cinema's don't have the big modal issues of a typical room. That is why I call a domestic space of nearly any size small, who has a room with dimensions 50 feet or more in all directions?
 
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