Yamaha R-N803 or Outlaw RR2160?

Discussion in 'Two Channel Hi-Fi Equipment' started by cgramer, May 15, 2018 at 2:37 PM.

?

Yamaha R-N803 or Outlaw Audio RR2160?

  1. Yamaha R-N803

    1 vote(s)
    25.0%
  2. Outlaw Audio RR2160

    2 vote(s)
    50.0%
  3. Something else (add to the thread)

    1 vote(s)
    25.0%
  1. cgramer

    cgramer Member
    Thread Starter

    Joined:
    May 3, 2018
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    I'm looking to replace my ancient Pioneer SX-680 stereo receiver with something current. I plan to use at least one, but most likely two subwoofers in my system, so a solution that has built-in bass management is crucial. After doing my research, I've narrowed my choices down to the two models mentioned in the subject line, the Yamaha R-N803 and the Outlaw Audio RR2160. The pricing is close ($750 for the Yamaha, $799 for the Outlaw), the specs are similar, and generally the features are also quite comparable.

    The Yamaha has more features in the realm of streaming audio/Internet connectivity, it has Bluetooth built in instead of requiring a dongle, and it has built-in WiFi (the Outlaw requires a wired Ethernet connection). It uses its YPAO room correction system and their smartphone app to integrate the speakers and sub(s).

    However, the Outlaw has a few features the Yamaha doesn't, such as pre-out/main in connections (in case I want to upgrade to a better power amp down the road), a processor loop in case I decide to go all old-school and add an equalizer (or keep my dbx subharmonic synthesizer in the system), and it has HD Radio, which I've grown to love listening to in the car. The Outlaw has its (analog) bass management settings on the back panel.

    I'm leaning towards the Yamaha due to its more advanced connectivity features, assuming that the sound quality from either of these receivers is going to be top-notch for the price range. Has anyone here heard/used both? If so, which did you prefer, and why, especially with regard to sound quality?

    In either case, I plan to pair the receiver with floorstanding speakers (possibly Chane A5.4s, Q Acoustics 3050is, or ELAC Debut 2.0 F6.2s) and two small subs (Hsu Research VTF-1 MK3s or SVS SB-1000s).

    Any opinions, advice, or random gibberish is welcome. :)

    Thanks!
    --Chris
     
    #1 cgramer, May 15, 2018 at 2:37 PM
    Last edited: May 15, 2018 at 3:26 PM
  2. cgramer

    cgramer Member
    Thread Starter

    Joined:
    May 3, 2018
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    I should add that I am aware of the Parasound Halo integrated amplifier, but at around $2,500, it's way above my budget. My dream amp would actually be the Anthem STR integrated amp, but that's even pricier at $4,500. A guy can dream...
     
  3. ddude003

    ddude003 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2017
    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    Somewhere Northeast of Kansas City Missouri
    You might download the owners manual for the Yamaha and take a close look at how to do a manual PQE along with or without YPAO...

    Have you compared this R-N803 to the AVENTAGE line RX-A770 or RX-A870 which look to bracket the R-N803 in features and pricing... These have Preouts...

    Good luck in your choices...
     
  4. cgramer

    cgramer Member
    Thread Starter

    Joined:
    May 3, 2018
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    Thanks, I'll check that out.

    That's been suggested to me before (getting an AVR), but there are a few reasons I want to stick with two-channel gear. One is that I feel the amps in the two receivers I'm looking at are probably of higher quality than those in an AVR at a similar price point. Another reason is that I know myself, and if I've got 5 or 7 channels of available amplification, as well as surround processing, available, I'm going to feel compelled to make use of all that and will end up with a 7.2-channel system that's way more complex than I want to deal with, particularly the mounting and wiring of all those speakers. :)

    --Chris
     
  5. cgramer

    cgramer Member
    Thread Starter

    Joined:
    May 3, 2018
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    Forgot to mention the poll at the top of this thread. Please vote. :)
     
  6. leecreek

    leecreek Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2017
    Messages:
    220
    Likes Received:
    40
    Location:
    Eastern North Carolina
    I presently use 2 Yamaha AVR's, a 2092 and a 2030. Both work fine. BUT I have heard a friend's Outlaw 2150 and was impressed with the sound. Right now I am saving up for a Outlaw 2160. YMMV as I really think you could not go wrong with either but the sound of the Outlaw really was clean and clear. And after owning two Yamaha AVR's I think the Outlaw specs are more honest as to what you are getting. Some where around here I saw a pic from Apoxna of a room where there a 2160 was powering up the demo. Just my 2 cents.....
     
    cgramer likes this.
  7. Matthew J Poes

    Matthew J Poes Staff Writer
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2017
    Messages:
    1,067
    Likes Received:
    156
    Well Since Peter Tribeman is a friend and I have utmost respect for his companies my vote goes to the Outlaw.

    In all seriousness I’ve heard and used the 2160. It sounds great. It’s basicalmy a small high end amp that can drive pretty much any speaker with ease. It’s bass management is all analogue which is nice for avoiding redundant conversion or any digital conversion if using a turntable. It’s really well made. It’s build and parts would be three times more money if anyone else built it.

    The D/A converter in it is good quality as well.
     
    leecreek likes this.

Share This Page