Ikea wooden furniture vibrates between 80Hz and 110hz

frank71

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Hi all, I'm a newbie and I'm trying to improve my home theatre acoustic room quality. First of all (the noise is very loud) I've found that in my actual room my Ikea wooden furniture vibrates (resonates?) between 80Hz and 110Hz.
How can I do?
Thanks!
 

Lip

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Is it real wood , or something that looks like wood (Ikea Lack tafel)?
 

frank71

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Exactly the old Ikea series "anedoba"
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thanks
 

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Lip

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When you remove the drawers, does it still resonate?
 

frank71

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I can't try at this moment... But tomorrow I can verify that.
 

bvocal

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Take it out of the room. I'm serious. You really do not want anything with 5 sides in the room, and this is a 5 sided box full of 5 sided boxes. 5 sided boxes have resonances based on their dimensions and materials, which is always going to be bad... No hutches, fireplaces, old speakers with drivers removed, speakers not in use, book cases, the lot. Use shelving that is all open, no sidewalls etc.
Cheers.
 

frank71

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Thanks but I cannot taking it out! Tomorrow I'll try to remove the drawers... However, there is some way to reduce at minimum the possible resonances?
 

bvocal

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Not really. I mean, sure, glue mass loaded vinyl to parts or other things to change the apparent density of the object in order to change it's resonant frequency hoping to drop it down to a not a problem frequency. The cost of doing so would be so much more than the cost of the furniture it's not even funny.
I'll tell you 2 stories, as quickly as I can.
I know a guy, he is extremely smart, 40+ years audiophile, bought Magico M2 speakers, I went over after he had them some time, and listened. He was making excesses for them, said he needs new Nelson Pass amplifiers to control them from acoustic feedback. I pointed to the front of his room and said I wager that if you remove those 2 empty speaker cabinets with the drivers removed, that are holding up the TV, the 'acoustic feedback' 'caused by the 'weak amp' will be gone. It took 4-5 months for him to remove the empty speaker cabinets, but he did and now he doesn't need to spent $50,000 on new amps.
Story #2- My first acoustics exploration was in a room 11x17x8 feet, I did a lot of work on that room and there was something still wrong with the bass. I tried to solve the problem for months, finally I concluded that the only part of the room I didn't completely redo yet was the back wall, on that back wall there were 2 bookcases, the cheap particleboard type, full of big coffee table books, I thought diffusion and absorption...
When I make an acoustic change I like to be playing music while I do, as the change, if any, from the new element, will be audible as you place it.
As I wheeled the book cases out of place and out of the room I could hear that bass problem I could not fix... vanish.
Play it how you want, I've said my piece.
 
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