By Todd Anderson on Jan 6, 2019 at 11:14 AM
  1. Todd Anderson

    Todd Anderson News Editor / Reviewer/ Senior Admin
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    CES 2019: LG Revamps Its OLED Lineup with HDMI 2.1, True 4K/120Hz and More!

    [​IMG]
    (LG)
    (January 6, 2019) LG Electronics has released official details about its 2019 fleet of televisions, including big news: HDMI 2.1 technology will be integrated with select OLED and LCD models.

    While exciting, HDMI 2.1 is certainly the source of some concern for home theater enthusiasts considering new gear in the coming months, presenting the question: buy HDMI 2.0 gear now and enjoy, or wait for HDMI 2.1 to become more mainstream over the next several years? The HDMI 2.1 specification (which isn’t compatible with current HDMI cables) offers more bandwidth for future technologies, which is especially important for the coming wave of 8K televisions. Currently, HDMI 2.0 allows for 8K at 30Hz, while 2.1 allows for 4K at 120Hz, 8K at 60Hz and 120Hz… even 10K at 120Hz. That makes for both higher video resolutions and faster refresh rates. HDMI 2.1 also supports Dynamic HDR, enhanced audio return channel (eARC), variable refresh rates, auto low latency mode, and more.

    While mentioning the importance of HDMI 2.1’s high frame rate performance and eARC, along with variable refresh rates and auto low latency mode for gamers, LG’s CES press material focuses primarily on the company’s all-new α (Alpha) 9 Gen 2 intelligent processor and deep learning algorithm. These two tech features combine to give owners ease of use and smart home control through Alexa and Google Assistant, while optimizing video performance through adjustments to tone mapping and screen brightness based on ambient light conditions. The latter of which is important for TVs that reside in rooms that experience a wide range of lighting conditions through the course of a day.

    Secondarily, the α9 Gen 2 processor can natively upmix 2.0 audio to a 5.1 experience, while analyzing room noise to adjust audio settings for a tailored listening experience.

    Technology aside, LG’s new 2019 OLED lineup will consist of 4K models sold under the C9, E9, and W9 series, while a new Z9 Series offers true 8K performance with the 88-inch Z9 OLED TV. Additionally, LG says the α9 Gen 2 processor will power a 75-inch 8K LCD TV called the SM99.

    LG is also switching up the name of its premium 4K LCD TV lineup (SM9X and SM8X series), now calling it NanoCell TV. The new name is a nod to the televisions’ NanoCell technology that delivers better color accuracy, improved viewing angles, and ultra-thin design.

    LG has yet to release pricing and full model details, however more information should become available at the company’s CES press conference.
     
    #1 Todd Anderson, Jan 6, 2019
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2019
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Discussion in 'AV Industry News' started by Todd Anderson, Jan 6, 2019.

    1. Todd Anderson

      Todd Anderson News Editor / Reviewer/ Senior Admin
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      Just as a follow up: Rasmus Larsen at flatpannelshd has confirmed that all HDMI ports in the 2019 OLED models are full 48 Gb/s HDMI 2.1 ports.

      This is pretty big news for LG and fans of OLED. What does it mean for owners during 2019? Probably not much.
       
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    2. thrillcat

      thrillcat Moderator
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      I'm just watching for the 2018 models to drop soon so I can pick one up. For my living room, I don't need 8K (Wheel of Fortune won't be broadcasting 8K for at least another few weeks). I don't need gimicky auto-audio fine-tuning stuff. This isn't my primary critical viewer, just my Wheel Machine and nap-background noiser.
       
    3. Todd Anderson

      Todd Anderson News Editor / Reviewer/ Senior Admin
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      It is a bit puzzling. Japan has launched an 8K broadcast satellite.... yet here in the US, Fox broadcasts NFL games that look like they're 720p at best. It just feels like the 4K content potential really isn't being realized.

      Makes me wonder: will HDMI 2.1 primarily be enjoyed by gaming crowds for the next few years?

      The 4K disc market isn't great. Will there be an 8K disc market?
       
    4. thrillcat

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      All FOX and ABC broadcasts are, in fact, 720p.
       
    5. Matthew J Poes

      Matthew J Poes Staff Writer
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      I think we need to do a better job in this country utiliing emerging technology to make 4K and 8k streaming with full lossless surround soundtracks more a reality. It seems like we lack sufficient bandwidth in people’s homes and I’ve read a lot that suggests 5G could have the potential to change that.

      I have 1gig service here, from AT&T, fiber to the house, brand new wiring, and I get pretty spotty 1gig service. I get it, but at least a few times a week my speed drops to less than 1mb and I have to reset the modem. My WiFi is spotty at best and I’ve gone through half a dozen WiFi routers. Many of my smart and streaming devices can’t ytkizie the fastest WiFi speeds I have and thus cant stream at max capacity. I think until all that is fixed we are kind of hopeless on the 8k end. I also hate to see resolution for resolutions sake. Most TVs are too small to need it. How about higher quality. Better or less compression. More options.
       
    6. Matthew J Poes

      Matthew J Poes Staff Writer
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      Todd do you have any info on the roll-up screen LG introduced? I’m sold on that idea. I wasn’t sure what good a flexible screen would be until I saw that.

      I’d love a 80”-100” screen in my family room but no way my wife (or I) wants to dedicate 100” of wall space to that. If I can have a normal looking wall with a 100” screen that drops down or rises up, I’m sold! I also bet that in time that would be cheaper to sell. Shipping would be a lot less, easier to package.
       
    7. Todd Anderson

      Todd Anderson News Editor / Reviewer/ Senior Admin
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      The one they introduced last year?

      They had a demo on the CES show floor... looked interesting. I think manufacturing something as large as 100" would be a nightmare.
       
    8. Matthew J Poes

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      https://www.cnet.com/news/lgs-rolla...e-and-its-actually-going-on-sale-in-2019-ces/

      It’s apparently going into production. They have this newest version at CES this year. I’m sure it will be expensive but I imagine in time the price would come down. No reason it can’t.

      I mean, to me it makes more sense to make the TV disappear than it does to make it blend in as artwork. I like this concept.

      I imagine that making really large versions of these is easier than making a similar 100” or larger flat panel. A Panasonic engineer who worked on their giant Plasmas told me back then the biggest problems are getting a frame strong enough to hold the panel. He said you can’t use the same approach as was used with normal TV’s. The Panasonic was a mix of special glass and specially designed aluminum framing. I imagine the LCD based units, while lighter, are still a problem.
       
    9. Todd Anderson

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      Get your credit card(s) primed and ready.

      I can't imagine they were close to getting plasma to do this... they couldn't hit energy standards with the 65"-plus screens... let alone 100". And LCD needs a back or edge lit light... I'd imagine emissive screens are the only ones that can do this.

      It's an interesting concept... I guess a wall-mounted TV has never bothered me all that much. I'd be concerned about about wear and tear on the screen (and the motor assembly). Pretty cool, tho.
       
    10. Todd Anderson

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      Looks like an LG rep hinted that the roll-up TV would cost more than the giant 8K model. I suspect we won't see anything like this mainstream in the next few years.
       
    11. Matthew J Poes

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      Ugh so disappointed in them!

      The Panasonic Plasmas got as big as 153” but they were not a consumer product. It was sold through the pro-display division and was insanely expensive. It was exceedingly hard to ship as I understand.

      One of the groups I work with has a 103” Plasma monitor instead of a projector in the conference room. It’s great, we can keep the lights on and see the content clearly.
       
    12. mechman

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      Wish I was there with you Todd!
       
    13. Robert Zohn

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      Here's my three part interview with Neil Robinson, LG's Senior Director of Strategic Partnerships. This interesting and informative video interview features Neil discussing new features and advancement in the OLED panels and the new a9 2nd generation and several new calibration features of the 2019 LG OLED TVs.





      This 3rd video starts off with motion but then talks about HDR peak luminance and Color Volume.

       

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